Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th International Conference on Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology Melbourne, Australia.

Day 1 :

Immunopharmacology 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fouad M Sharabi photo
Biography:

Fouad Moustafa Sharabi is a PhD, Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Egypt. He has teaching and research experience, professional background including pharmaceutical, hospital and clinical pharmacy services. Previously, he was enrolled in academic leadership positions: Head of Pharmacology and Toxicology department, then as Vice Dean of students’ affairs and acting Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy. Presently, he is also the Head of the National scientific committee for Faculty promotion of Professors and Associate Professors in the specialization of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy of the Faculties of Pharmacy in the Egyptian Universities. Additionally, he was involved in various activities including continuing education services, drug development for Pharmaceutical Companies, certified Specialist of Medical Analysis and administrative work (previous General coordinator of clinical pharmacy program). He was honored by the University of Alexandria Appreciation Prize 2014. He has participated in several local and International scientific meeting and invited lectures and coauthor of several International textbooks.

Abstract:

Many steps are involved in physiological signal transduction to end into the final biological response. A cascade of reaction starts from the original signals or factors which act on the cell membrane, followed by chain reactions, which leads to translocation of specific signal proteins to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, transcription factors are formed and subsequent translation leading to generation of protein(s) necessary for the final biological response. By understanding the sequence of these reactions, it is possible to intervene at different steps to stop an abnormal or overactivated reaction to control certain pathological conditions. Connective tissue disorders (CTD) exemplified by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), lupus and others as dermatomyositis (DM), scleroderma have been shown to be involved in a mutated or over activated sequence of reactions. In lupus, an excessive formation of a stimulator called Blys or BAFF results in overactive B cells, hence, augmented plasma cells and consequent release of autoantibodies that form deleterious complexes in various organs and tissue in the body resulting in dysfunction and morbid effects. Also, various cytokines including TNF, INF, Interleukins are excessively released to add to the deleterious effects on normal body functions. The same applies to RA in which overactive T and B cells and associated cytokines exert cytotoxic effects on joints and body system targeting and damaging effectors components of tissues. Biological agents including antibodies and fusion proteins have been devised for blocking and targeting the following mis-regulated sites: growth signal and factors, affected cells, receptor sites, components of cascade reactions and released cytokines. Examples include the following: IL1 inhibitors (Anakinra), IL6 inhibitors (Toclizumab), CD20 inhibitors (Rituximab), CD 22 inhibitors (Epratuzumab), BAFF (Blys) inhibitors (Belizumab), APRIL inhibitors (Atacicept), Costimulation Inhibitor (Abatacept) and TNF Inhibitor (Infliximab and similar). These agents mainly target the components responsible for the pathological pathway and call for the immune system to coordinate for the removal of the offending components of the disease. No doubts, these agents have been considered as an armamentarium to stop the progress of the above mentioned disabling, aggressive pathological conditions for the goal of curing and improving quality of life. Although these are considered as recent breakthrough in the field of targeted immunotherapy for CTD, high cost presents a barrier for the wide clinical use of these agents. In addition, they might increase the susceptibility to infection because of the immune depressing effects of these biologics beside the activation of dormant diseases and potential cancerous conditions and possible precipitation of allergic manifestations.

Keynote Forum

Akeau Unahalekhaka

Chiang Mai University, Thailand

Keynote: Effective prevention of medication errors to promote patient safety
Immunopharmacology 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Akeau Unahalekhaka photo
Biography:

Akeau Unahalekhaka is a Professor at Faculty of Nursing, Chaing Mai University, Thailand. She has graduated with Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science and PhD in Epidemiology. She has also received Certificate in Surveillance and Applied Epidemiology for HIV and AIDS from CDC, USA and certificate in statistical, epidemiological and operational methods applied in medicine and public health from University of Brussels, Belgium. She is the President of Nursing Association for Prevention and Control of Infections (NAPCI) Thailand, Consultant of Central Sterilization Service Association of Thailand and many hospitals in Infection Prevention and Control (IPC). She is currently an Editorial Council Member of The International Journal of Infection Control (IJIC) of the International Federation of Infection Control (IFIC). She has written many books on IPC and Disinfection and Sterilization. Her research interest includes infection, prevention and control; disinfection and sterilization and epidemiology.

Abstract:

Patients have two main risks when they are hospitalized-infectious and non-infectious risks. Infectious risks are healthcare-associated infections and non-infectious risks are medical errors. Both risks can cause serious consequences to the patients and their families from longer hospital stay, higher costs of treatment, disability to death. Medication error is an important medical error. Protection of the patients from medication errors need high alert, strong intention, sustain collaboration and implementation among multidisciplinary hospital personnel. In order to effectively protect the patients from medication errors, hospital personnel should recognize the magnitude and severity of the problems which need good surveillance and reporting system, aware of the consequences, impacts and burdens from the incidents, understand causes and risk factors of medication errors. This information is very useful to determine effective and practical preventive measures. Attitude of hospital personnel is important in reporting medication errors to recognize the real situation. It is necessary to encourage hospital personnel to identify and promptly report any errors that have been occurred. Significant gains cannot be accomplished without organizational policies and procedures. Besides, implementation of preventive measures to obtain good sustainable outcomes, healthcare facilities have to identify barriers which can impact the outcomes of the intervention. Prevention of medication errors can be achieved by collaborative quality improvement, establishing medication safety and reporting system, monitoring practices and feedback the incidents to personnel.

  • Health Care | Pharmacology in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing | Oncology Nursing | Pharmacology & Toxicology
Location: Novotel Melbourne St Kilda
Speaker
Biography:

Amal I Khalil is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Mental Health Nursing at the Menoufia University, Egypt. Currently, he is working in King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for health sciences, college of nursing, Jeddah, where she was awarded many times for her teaching activities, community and social contributions. She was nominated as a reviewer to the Journal of Horizon Research Publishing, Journal of Nursing and Health USA and International Journal of Nursing and Clinical Practices. She had also worked as a Psychotherapist at a private practice and has membership in American Psychiatric Nurse Association, family and child safety program related to National Guard health affairs, Saudi Arabia and KAFA institution for smoking and addiction management.

Abstract:

Background: Each child around the world has the right to live his life in peace. Child sexual abuse is a serious public health problem globally.

Aim: To investigate the effectiveness of an educational program targeting children sexual abuse in developing Saudi mothers’ knowledge and awareness about children sexual abuse.

Methods: A quasi-experimental of one group pre-post-test design was used with a convenient sample of 38 mothers who have children in the 81 elementary school affiliated to ministry of education, Jeddah, KSA.

Results: A 38 Saudi mothers’ majority of them (89%) were aged between 20 and 40 years. Majority (57.9%) of them had 4-6 children and has secondary level of education (55.3%). A highly statistically significant difference between pre/post assessment knowledge as P=0.000 with difference in their attitudes but is not significant. While, significant correlation was found between the total score of pre/post knowledge assessment and the mothers’ work state as P=0.000 and 0.037. However, there was a significant difference in the participants post knowledge total score (P=0.006) with number of children in the family P≤0.05 level. Moreover, the age of children and total score of pre/post mothers’ knowledge and attitude, only a negative significant difference was found in pre knowledge participants total score (P=-0.001).

Conclusion & Recommendation: The results concluded that mothers’ knowledge and attitude were inadequate enough to protect their children from CSA in pre assessment with a significant difference in post assessment. Therefore, it is recommended that, conducting more CSA prevention programs for parents and children is an urgent necessity, to increase their knowledge, level of awareness and to change their attitude regarding CSA teaching program, in addition, replication of the current study with longitudinal design that might help in identifying the change of attitudes.

Speaker
Biography:

Akeau Unahalekhaka is a Professor at Faculty of Nursing, Chaing Mai University, Thailand. She has graduated with Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science and PhD in Epidemiology. She has also received Certificate in Surveillance and Applied Epidemiology for HIV and AIDS from CDC, USA and certificate in statistical, epidemiological and operational methods applied in medicine and public health from University of Brussels, Belgium. She is the President of Nursing Association for Prevention and Control of Infections (NAPCI) Thailand, Consultant of Central Sterilization Service Association of Thailand and many hospitals in Infection Prevention and Control (IPC). She is currently an Editorial Council Member of The International Journal of Infection Control (IJIC) of the International Federation of Infection Control (IFIC). She has written many books on IPC and Disinfection and Sterilization. Her research interest includes infection, prevention and control; disinfection and sterilization and epidemiology.

Abstract:

Background: Glass particle fragmentation and ampoule contamination upon opening have been previously reported for more than 5 decades.

Aim: This study aimed to determine whether there were still glass particles contaminated in single dose glass ampoules.

Methods: Eight hundred (800) 10 ml sterile water for injection ampoules were inspected for glass particle contamination upon opening. Ampoules were opened by 400 nursing personnel of 3 tertiary care hospitals using their normal practices (2 ampoules per 1 nurse). Glass particle contamination was inspected by stereomicroscope and size and number of particles were inspected by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Results: 798 ampoules were inspected. Glass particles were detected in 65% of ampoules (95% CI: 61.6-68.3). Size of particles, detected from 20 positive samples from stereomicroscope inspection, ranged from 8-172 micron. The mean numbers of glass particles detected were: 47.8±20.4 for particle size <50 micron, 3.7±3.2 for size 51-100 micron and 0.6±1.07 for size 101-200 micron. Among 20 negative samples from stereomicroscope inspection (no glass particle detected), SEM could detect glass particles with sizes ranged from 8 to 54 microns. The mean numbers of glass particles detected were: 27.8±21.8 for particle size <50 micron, 0.75±1.2 for size 51-100 micron and 0.5±0.2 for size 101-200 micron.

Conclusion: Glass particle contamination occurs on opening single dose glass ampoules. Hospital personnel should be aware and carefully draw the content in the ampoule.

Speaker
Biography:

Jerry John Nutor is a PhD candidate at Drexel University, College of Nursing and Health Professions. He is registered nurse with Master degree in Nursing and Healthcare leadership from University of California, Davis. His long-term research goal is to develop new ways of improving health care for underrepresented segments of the population, such as rural and urban communities in sub-Saharan Africa.

Abstract:

Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a major problem in sub-Saharan Africa despite increasing availability of free and subsidized antiretroviral treatment (ART) medication. MTCT can be significantly reduced provided pregnant and breastfeeding mothers adhere to prescribed regimens. Access to potable water and adequate sanitation declared as basic human rights by the United Nations, is a major problem in low-resource countries including Zambia, located in Sub-Saharan Africa. Using the social-ecological model and the theory of planned behavior, we are investigating the influence of WASH on ART adherence intention among HIV positive pregnant and breastfeeding women enrolled in Option B+ ART regimen, the current World Health Organization recommendation for low resource countries. We will examine how urban vs. rural residence modifies ART adherence intention overall and in relation to WASH, since access to WASH and other resources varies greatly by residence location. We are recruiting a total of 150 pregnant or breastfeeding HIV positive women who are taking antiretroviral medications and reside in either the Lusaka (urban) or Sinazongwe (rural) districts of Zambia. Participants are being asked about WASH situations in their homes and communities and their intention of adhering to ART. We are also collecting information about the women’s beliefs, attitudes and norms surrounding ART adherence intention. We will use descriptive and inferential statistics to examine associations between WASH and ART adherence intentions. Knowledge gained will be used to design culturally and setting appropriate WASH educational intervention programs.

Howaida Saati

King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Saudi Arabia

Title: Patient experience and perception of chemotherapy in Saudi Arabia
Speaker
Biography:

Howaida Saati has completed his PhD from Northumbria University the UK. She is the Assistant Professor at King Saud bin Abdul Aziz for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. She has achieved the fellow status membership of the British Higher Education Academy, UK. She is a Quality Surveyor at NCAAA in Saudi Arabia which concern the quality of education among Saudi and Gulf universities and CBCAHI Surveyor which concern the quality for patient safety among Saudi and Gulf health institutions.

Abstract:

The overall aim of this research is to characterize the experience, knowledge and attitude with regard to cancer and chemotherapy among Saudi adult oncology patients, as well as the role of the oncology team, particularly oncology nurses, in supporting patients undergoing chemotherapy. We envisage that our findings will be beneficial for oncology nurses to enhance their understanding of patient needs and improve their practice by using a patient-centered approach to oncology services. Specific objectives of this study are to assess: (1) Patients’ understanding of the nature of their disease, their cancer diagnosis and treatment plan, (2) The influence of culture and religion on patients’ perception and acceptance of diagnosis and cancer treatment, (3) The level of family support throughout the chemotherapy treatment journey, (4) Patients’ experiences pre- and post-chemotherapy concerns, needs, communication preferences with an emphasis on the patient interaction with the oncology health team and (5) The role of oncology nurses in ensuring the overall quality of care and support needed by cancer patients before and after chemotherapy. This is an exploratory study assessing the experience, using questioner to explore the knowledge and attitudes of adult Saudi oncology patients with regard to their cancer diagnosis and treatment and highlighting the role of oncology nurses in supporting the patient experience of chemotherapy at Princess Nora Oncology Center, King Abdul Aziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The findings of this study is used to guide healthcare professionals and in particular oncology nurses, in their approach for delivering care to cancer patients and establishing a patient-centered approach to oncology services.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Break: 15:10-15:30
Speaker
Biography:

Divya Maheta currently studying in post graduate department of pharmacology at B. K. Mody Government Pharmacy College, Rajkot, India (Gujarat Technological University) which is only government pharmacy college of state. I have finished my graduation from same institute. During my graduation study, I have been invited as a speaker for international conference at U.S.A. and presented research poster at national level conference in INDIA. In September month of current year, I have presented research work in international conference at Dubai and served as a moderator in same conference too.

Abstract:

The objective of present study was studying anti-obesity effect of polyherbal formulation comprising fruits of EmbeliaribesBurm.,EmblicaofficinalisGeartn., Terminalia chebulaRetzr., Terminalia belericaRoxb., Piper nigrumLinn.andPiper longumLinn., rhizomes of ZingiberofficinalisRoscoe., and cow urine distillate. Selected plant parts as mentioned above were collected, powdered and extracted with distilled water or methanol separately. Four different formulations were prepared (SJTOb-1 to SJTOb-4) and evaluated for its effect on reduction in cholesterol level using triton induce hyperlipidemia model. SJTOb-1 (200 mg/kg, p.o.) which has shown optimal effect was further evaluated for its effect on lipid profile using triton and atherogenic diet induce hyperlipidemia model using atorvastatin (1 mg/kg, p.o.) as reference standard drug. Additionally, the SJTOb-1 was investigated for its mechanism of action by estimating HMG Co-A reductase activity, fecal cholesterol excretion, brain serotonin level and anorectic activity. Further, SJTOb-1 at 200 mg/kg was tested for toxic effect and was standardized by estimating phytoconstituent.At dose 200 mg/kg, the SJTOb-1significantly decreased (p<0.001) the total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and VLDL while it significantly
increased (p<0.001) the level of HDL. The SJTOb-1 also significantly inhibit (p<0.001) the HMG Co-A reductase activity. Fecal cholesterol excretion and brain serotonin level was significantly increased (p<0.05) by SJTOb-1. In anorectic activity, SJTOb-1 significantly delayed gastric emptying (p<0.001) while food intake was decreased (p<0.05). Toxicity study indicated that the SJTOb-1 at therapeutic dose is safe. Phytochemical estimation showed that SJTOb-1 was rich in flavanoid, phenolics and alkaloids. In conclusion, the present study revealed that the SJTOb-1 demonstrated its cholesterol reducing effect by increasing fecal cholesterol excretion and decreasing cholesterol biosynthesis. Additionally the effect on brain serotonin level, gastric emptying time and food intake indicate that the SJTOb-1 could have potentially beneficial effect in obesity and related complications like hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension.

Biography:

Abstract:

The effect of Lecanicillium muscarium on Puccinia oxalidis was investigated. Oxalis is a common edible weed characterized by high concentrations of oxalic acid. The plants were inoculated with urediospores of P. oxalidis by dusting uninfected oxalis plants with leaves of rust-infected plants. Symptoms appeared after 4-5 days. The biocontrol agent (L. muscarium) occurred naturally on the infected leaves and was isolated at the later stage of P. oxalidis development on the abaxial surface of the infected leaves. Samples of L. muscarium were taken from an infected pustule of P. oxalidis and streaked onto potato dextrose agar plates and incubated at 28oC. PDA plates with colonies of L. muscarium were placed under UV light to stimulate sporulation and from those plates’ three different concentrations 102, 104, and 106 conidia/ml1- were prepared. The prepared concentrations were supra-inoculated on rust infected leaves. The concentration of 106 conidia/ml1- provided a better control of the pathogen since on average it colonized more than 70 percent of the pustules per plant. The concentration of 104 conidia/ml1- controlled only 26. 49 percent of pustules and there was no huge difference from 102 conidia/ml1- which gave 25 percent colonization. Spore penetrations by L. muscarium on urediospores viewed by scanning electron microscope were evident on those pustules that were supra-inoculated with the concentration of 106 conidia/ml1-. Hyperparasitism was predominant on the lower concentrations which did not manifest spore penetration. The results demonstrated that L. muscarium should be applied in relatively high concentrations in order to colonize more pustules of P. oxalidis. The potential of L. muscarium in controlling rust for commercial crops will be tested on chapter under greenhouse conditions. 

Atieh Asadollah

Islamic azad university of medical science, Iran

Title: The role of barberry (Berberis) in miscarriage and RPL
Speaker
Biography:

Studying medicine at Islamic azad university of medical science, attending international congresses and presenting posters, being a member in scientific committee in the 1st international congress of cancer pain management, being executive member in the 2nd oncology congress of mahak rehabilitation.

Abstract:

Several species of Berberis (A.K.A Barberry) are traditionally used as appetizer, emollient, antihypertensive, and coagulant agents. It is known by the name of Zereshk in the persian language, and it has a big place in persian alimentation. Avicenna, The great persian scientist, believed that the root and fruit of this plant has serious effects on miscarriage and human pregnancy loss. This research, Inspired from Avicenna’s theory, investigated the stimulating effect of Barberry’s extract and Berberine alkaloid, on rat uterus contraction, and it’s possible role in miscarriage and RPL. The uterus was induced by Acetylcholine (ACh), KCl, and Oxytocin. Barberry’s extract stimulates the uterine contraction induced by ACh, KCl, and Oxytocin but Berberine had inhibitory effects on rat uterus smooth muscle induced by KCl.

Berberine is one of the main alkaloids in Barberry. Our studies showed that berberine acted as an inhibitor to induce relaxation, Whereas the Barberry’s extract mostly caused contractions. The relaxing effects of Berberine might be as the result of Ca2+ channel blocking as it inhibited the response to KCl, but other alkaloids contained in Barberry’s extract, are believed to be responsible for ACh, KCl, Oxytocin induced stimulation through mechanisms other than voltage operated Ca2+ channels. Therefore, the general belief is that Barberry is potential to increase the risk of miscarriage and overusing it during pregnancy may cause abortion or pretime labor. Identification of the main stimulating alkaloid components is recommended for future studies